Piano Practice & Music Theory 16-11-2020-21-11-20.

Feedback:

I was told that I had a big improvement from last week.

For my contrary motions, I’ve learnt a nice circle motion for technique.

I’ve got tension from trying to keep myself relaxed, funnily enough. It must be the ‘level-up’ variant from the original tension I possessed, for the tension isn’t as bad as before.

Keep going. It’s been over two months. Keep going. My wrists hurt, my fingers hurt.


Keep going.

Some things I ought to do:
*I need to keep my fingers more curved. And strengthen my fingers with squeeze ball exercises.

What I need is good strength, in a good curved position. Focus on squeezing with the fingers. The strength of the pianist comes from the feet. This is where it is sourced from–and the energy is channeled from the base of the feet, to the spine… and finally, to the hands.

Always have a flat curve with fingers. ‘Horizon Fingers’, or a ‘Dome’ in my case, due to my protruding nail beds.

Right: Middle finger needs more work, to strengthen it.
Left: All fingers.

This is needed (finger strength, at the fore-knuckles and a good curve), so that efficiency for energy can be established… otherwise the pianist will restrict blood flow to their fingers. The piano demands a lot of physical strength!

Sometimes pianists don’t play notes. Sometimes the finger doesn’t hit the key right, with enough weight. I do recall my asking some pianists “Did you miss any notes.” To which they were quick to admit. Even a prodigy, I had observed, admitted that he did miss some in a Liszt piece. That is what I am afraid of. However, I shouldn’t be afraid of it. Every pianist does it. My tension is sourced from this anxiety.

I want to hit every note. However, I shouldn’t be concerned with that.

Music Theory (Grade II):

Tenuto: Hold down the note for it complete, and total value. It is an emphasis on a separate note, that it must be played as its notational value.

Accent: Is sort of like adding forte to a single note, as opposed to a whole bar/measure.

Interestingly enough for 6/8 versus 3/4, the correct grouping for crotchets, being three per bar is only applicable to a 3/4 bar-except! If the 6/8 bar is a hemiola.

The accents are grouped differently, within a hemiola.

The 6/8 meter, by default, does not work that way.

Now, pulses and beats. Pulses are often found in compound meters–although simple meters do have pulses, they are only apparent through subdivision. Pulses are known by compound meters, for that reason.

  • Annotation of treble and bass clefs in all known key signatures, at 2 8Ves.
  • Practice the difference between the clefs. Bass and Treble. Always read the clef.
    • Memorization of Grade II terms and definitions:

      *Mezzo is pronounced: Metzo. Mezzo-forte means ‘Moderately loud’. One plays at a standard volume for that bar.

      *When there is a hyphen between two dynamics on a bar, this signifies that one play that second dynamic when one repeats a piece. I.E: Mf-p.



      Two different forms:


      Binary: Two part sections.

      Basic Ternary: Three part sections.
      A section and B section.
      The pattern goes as follows: A-B-A.

      The A and B section are both different to one another. One can also render the A section for the last part (the second A), to be A-prime if needed. However, the variation is slight.
    • If the A section repeats itself, at the end, the form is ternary.

      Now, into the territory of themes.

      Note: Thematic material means, the theme, basically.

      Abstract/pure music does not tell a story. For example, many of Mozart’s sonatas do not tell a specific story. There is no context.

      There is thematic material in all music. The melody can demonstrate the theme, for instance. If one were to listen to a the first bars to a quadrille, for instance… a theme sets the ‘sound’ to put it crudely. Which permeates throughout the entire piece.
    • Note: A light motif, refers to the specific character or feeling within a narrative. However, from movement to movement within the piece, it reoccurs. Unlike Saint-Saenz’s “The Carnival Of The Animals.” Light motifs are found, most often in Operas.

Pianistic Practice:

This week, I focus on Dynamics and articulations.

Repertoire:

Saint-Saenz’s Carnival Of The Animals ‘Lions’.
Dynamics, needs to be refined.

+ Piano
+ Mezzo-Forte
+ Mezzo-Piano
+ Forte

To make it louder, apply more force/weight. Not tension.

Mozart’s ‘Aria’.
Needs to be learnt. The introduction of Semi-quavers and dotted quavers. The subdivision count can either be [Ti]kati[Ti]kati… or One-E-And-A-Two-E-And-A-Three-E-And-A-Four-E… and so forth.

Haydn’s Quadrille.
Needs to be mastered more so. Especially the hand movement, in the middle of the bar.

Scales:

*New scale: Chromatic scales, C Major and G Major.

The refinement of curved fingers, finger strengthening, and keeping the wrists raised above the keys as the default position will be the focus. Eventually, this will be allow the wrists to drive the fingers for playing. I cannot advance to more complicated repertoire, unless I do this.

When one is playing chords, or intervals… and holding them. One lifts up, not down with the hand. You must allow your hands that mobility to move across the keys, however, they must be grounded upon the keys… just as well.

Some listening’s:

The sexy Percy Grainger.

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