PhD Progress PT II (Drawing)

An update to the former post of a digital drawing I’ve been working on today. Here’s a portion of the cover, somewhat finished. The glitchy effect was by accident, but I loved it so much I decided to keep it as a side piece to the original cover.

The title is withheld until the comic is published of course.

I seem to have a thing for hands, truth be. Especially long fingers. That’s probably why I like most pianists.

Photoshop CS6 was used, with a Wacom Intuos pro tablet. A whole lot of references via google, were also used.

It’s been a while since I’ve drawn, admittedly… in-between my other responsibilities I have been trying my best to fit it in. Not just drawing, but painting, as well!

I’m influenced from a lot of artists, truth be… if anyone can guess my influences in this piece. Feel free! Of course, I will admit this time around I didn’t consciously reference any particular artist. I focused on rendering values, and playing with colour instead.

No this isn’t me, my Nephew seems to think so. This is Stuart. His appearance is one I’d like to imagine what my future son would look like (all of my drawings are my children)… hypothetically-speaking of course. That is, if I ever do get around to having a son. IF.

PhD Cover progress

Pianism and music has been put on hold for my other responsibilities. There isn’t a lot of time in day, sadly… or, I’m just terrible at time management. Here’s what I’ve been working on, in-between marking students’ work for my sessional job as a drawing instructor:

Meryl Keioskie
Stuart

The cover for my PhD comic. Admittedly, it’s been a while since I’ve digitally painted anything therefore, with this drawing I’ve been doing studies here and there.

Music Practice. 05-04-2021 to 10-04-2021

Feedback:

I have decided to take the plunge and upgrade to a beautiful acoustic piano. A second-hand Yamaha UX upright, which I will be practicing until… I predict, AMUS. I have named him “Alistair”. Some may call me weird, strange… and definitely I am those things. I see my piano as a breathing, organic instrument. He is made of wood, after-all and although he has most likely passed through many hands, he is as much as mine as he was the others. I will love him, and he will love me.

Alistair sits in the background.

Alistair is polished, and dusted frequently. I treat him with care, for soon enough he will be someone else’s. Alistair, like most pianos pass through many hands. Just like a lover would…

As I play his keys, I wonder who graced them before I ever did… what became of them? Are they still pianists? Have I crossed paths with them? Has a terrible fate befallen any of them? Who are they… I’m strange like that, yes.

As for my previous keyboard, Alexander, he has been given to my Nephew who has taken an interest to music. Hopefully Alexander, serves him well.

I have also purchased a Theremin, and will name her accordingly.

I have, attempted to… through the weeks… sluice in 3 hours a day, of practice on the piano.

By way of feedback, my teacher is happy with my progress/ She mentions that my technique is excellent. For next week, I must focus on learning repertoire.

Scales:

*NEW:
D Major. (LH/RH)
B Natural Minor. (LH/RH)
B Harmonic Minor. (LH/RH)

Bb Major. (LH/RH)
G Natural Minor. (LH/RH)
G Harmonic Minor. (LH/RH)
D Chromatic scale. (LH/RH)

Note: Currently I know up to 2 flats, and sharps for key signatures. The sevenths being raised for each minor, does not count. By the end of the year, I hope to surpass this to at least 4 flats and sharps.

Theory:
More to do on SATB chords and such…

Repertoire:

“In The Hall Of The Mountain King” by Grieg.

Drawing Dump.

I forgot to post these drawings, I did. They’re from 2019.

Alain.
Meryl Keioskie
Self-portrait.
Meryl Keioskie

At this moment, I am still practicing pianism and music theory. Mind the delay in updates… more or less, I’ve other things to tend to. Enjoy these drawings, anyhow.

Music Practice. 13-03-2021 to 20-03-2021.

Feedback:

This is indeed the year for piano. I’ve marked my calendar/schedule for many pianistic events to take place–specifically at The Conservatorium. I see it as wise, to sit in the front row… directly parallel to the view of the keyboard, and the performer’s hands on the keys… so that I may observe their technique.

In my observations, although sparse… (I began learning piano five months ago, and I began attending musical events, the very same) weight is never forced/sourced from the fingers. Physiologically speaking, that would be impossible. Fingers don’t have ‘muscles’ (Sorry, Hanon, your exercises are outdated). The mechanic of movement, that the finger joints are capable of are by way of tendons–which, of course run up the entire course of one’s arms.

Therefore, an efficient way of playing is to never play from the fingers… but rather, through conventions of gravity. Source weight from the pivot of the wrists (whilst keeping them loose) and elbows. With a drop–and of course, the fingers will be shifting positions in a subtle push forward (for standard legato) all the while. Staccato is handled differently, where the push is inverted with the tips. Of course, these aren’t the only muscles to consider. The entire body, is used for piano.

In my sitting closest to a pianist, last performance I had attended… I could hear breathing. The fellow played for an hour, just as well… with little breaks/intermissions, and of course–he did an encore performance for his adoring crowd. Beautiful hands, intelligent playing–grace. He is one of the staff members at The Conservatorium, he looks a bit like Mr. Six from Six flags (Mr. six is cool, don’t worry) and seems to scream PIANO from his very pores.

Err… literally, he was sweating. In-fact, any pianists performing repertoire which is demanding WILL sweat profusely. This fellow was playing Bach, Liszt, Schumann, and Rachmaninov for his entire performance. He’d stop between each movement, crack his hands/fingers at his sides… brace himself for the next piece… taking note that he had no music sheets in-front of him, to speak of. He is such a lord. Lord of the keys!

Sweat pianists, sweat. I’ll smile all the while.

Note: Musicianship will be added to my learning curriculum, mid-year. I will be moved up to fourth grade Musicianship, via the AMEB standard. When I advance far enough, to AMUS, I will be sitting some tests to earn some qualifications in-relation to the theoretical conventions of music. Musicianship, or Music theory. As for my progression in playing, I foresee that this will be a more gradual progression. Eventually, when reaching past seventh grade, I will sit an exam, the very same.

After doing so, I intend to attend Music School. And perhaps, eventually, I wish to bridge into higher-education, so as to contribute to research in-relation. Although, knowing me, this is apt to change.

Why do this? Simple, because I can and I must. If I do not cease this opportunity now, I will live my life in regret. The time is now, for me!

Being a musician IS a trade skill.

Music Theory:

Some recommended listening from my teacher:
Ian Munro, Jason Gilliam, Boris Berezovsky (the pianist, not the politician).

With these recommendations, I’ve still my favorite. The Rat Stroganoff.

Rachmaninoff’s compositions always contain some of the most orgasmic climaxes, EVER. That’s romanticism, for you.

My rat is named after him. Hence, Ratmaninoff. When Ratmaninoff goes to the vet, they have no idea how to spell his name. One of the vets said they searched up the pianist, and listened to him for the first time. Good! More ears need to hear Rachmaninoff. I also have a pet-name for my rat, to which I call him “Rachmans“, which makes absolutely no sense, in reference to the original Rachmaninoff.

Frederic Chopin is also my favorite, and that’s mainly because Chopin was, in my opinion, hot. I gots me a thing for pianists. I won’t deny it.

GRADE III THEORY.

Scale Intervallic Sequences:

Major: T-T-S-T-T-T-S
Harmonic Minor: T-S-T-T-S-T1/2-S
Natural Minor: T-S-T-T-S-T-T

Melodic minors will be explored during 4th and 5th grade theory (AMEB).

It helps to remember these sequences, by remembering that TONES rest mid-way.

Accidentals:
I had trouble wrapping my head around accidentals at first, my teacher clarified this for me… thankfully!

For example, if one were adding a sharp to a Bb… this would make the note a B natural as opposed to a B#, since one would raise or lower the semitone in correspondence. Initially, I had assumed, that if one were to apply an accidental sharp to a Bb, it would lead one to play a B#–but this is not correct, especially when we are speaking in context of the piano, and how the piano keys sit. The sharp, as an accidental leads one to step up one semi-tone on the keyboard, whilst the flat has the inverse effect. As for double sharps, and flats… these would be equivalent to stepping up and down two semitones–which, would be akin to a tone (there are two semitones in one tone).


Inversions:
There is total of only two inversions, for triads. Bach’s repertoire, is demonstrative of some sexy inversions. Especially in his inventions.

Minors:
I asked my teacher for further clarification on the different types of minors, there are. In total, three: natural, harmonic, and melodic.

In reading a score with the key of a minor, it is played in the context of ‘harmonic minor’–therefore if a score was in A Minor, one would play the harmonic of that minor–with the seventh raised with an accidental, and not through the key signature (the key a minor has, is sourced from its major equivalent). The natural minor wasn’t introduced in the AMEB syllabus, until recently–for theoretical purposes.

The seventh of the harmonic minor, is raised in correspondence to its diatonic scale pattern.

I’ve been learning about triad chords thus far. I composed this minimalistic piece, some-time ago which makes use of triads. The piece ends on the tonic, giving it a proper conclusion (this is an unspoken rule that can be broken).

The triad chord in this piece is a Tonic Chord. It is built from F to C.

Take note, the 2nds of the Tonic chord for F Major (G), are also added to vary the melody, that is, in separation and not on the chord itself–the primary chords used in this composition, are however triads.

I may re-purpose this piece’s basic rhythm with a Median Chord, and Dominant chord to explore the possibilities further.

F-A-C (Tonic chord of F Major) I Chord.
C-E-G (Median chord of F Major, is essentially the same as the Tonic chord in C Major.) III Chord.
G-Bb-D (Dominant chord of F Major) V Chord.

When I advance to fourth grade theory, I will compose another piece–that is, with other chords in-mind. I also intend to compose some pieces in the minors I have learnt to play, thus far–that is, with the intention of raising the leading-tone (7th) up a semi-tone manually, through accidentals.

Note: Accidentals are called accidentals due to their only occurring, occasionally in the course of a musical composition. They are distinguishable from the key signature. Before accidentals, musicians played music, in-accordance to what their ears told them sounded good. This is known as ‘Musica Ficta’.

Etymologically speaking. Accidental is sourced from Medieval Latin–from “Accidentalis” and original Latin with “Accidentem”. It refers to something occurring outside the normal course of its intended nature. Therefore, the term accidental in the context of music is indeed very fitting.

For accidentals are characterized by both non-essential attributes, and occur outside of the expected nature of its context. In this case, the key signature.

More revision:


+ Chords. Completion of ‘Chords’ in AMEB ‘Theory Of Music’.
+ Annotation of bass clef, up and down two leger lines.
+ Scale degree revision. Technical names, and qualities.

Pianistic Practice:

Scales:

All 2 8VEs. RH, and LH. Contrary, and similar motion with both, also.

C Major
A Natural Minor
A Harmonic Minor

G Major
E Natural Minor
E Harmonic Minor

F Major
D Natural Minor
D Harmonic Minor

C Chromatic Scale.
G Chromatic Scale.
(New) D Chromatic Scale.

(New) D Major.

With scales, I exercise technical skill and use of the hands. Paying close attention to playing smooth, and even legato, with smooth tone of each note–just as well, experimenting with the movement of the tips, slightly expending force forward… and exercising the wiping motions for staccatos.

Scales, again are where I source much of my refinement of technique. I make it a habit to practice scales, right before practicing anything else in piano-work.

Repertoire:

“Royal March Of The Lion.”
“Quadrille”

Refinements of rhythm, and articulations. I am re-visiting these pieces, due to months prior… my hands were still being strengthened and trained to play properly. Technique, always, is at the forefront of my practice, past repertoire.


*LH push in, not down when playing.
*RH extension, keep grounded.
*Don’t miss any stacattos!
*Play bar, by bar. Not the entire piece.
*Slow, and relaxed. Be quick to go slow. Fracture mistakes. Don’t play the entire piece, through.

“A Little Hush Song” = New Repertoire.

Music Practice. 27-02-2021 to 06-02-2021.

I have been learning piano for roughly five months, now. Music theory, a good eight months, now. Before, I had learnt viola for a good three months–and had advanced to I grade music theory, in those three months. Viola wasn’t for me, I had found… piano, I love.

Before then, I had absolutely no knowledge of music at all. That is the truth. Therefore, I began learning music at the age of twenty-five. Music is indeed a worthy investment.

By that measure, it should take me roughly a year to advance to Grade IV music theory by AMEB standards. I am up to GRADE I repertoire for piano-work, and GRADE II for scales.

Mid-year, I will also be taking up MUSICIANSHIP by AMEB standards to learn.

Piano-work is slower to progress in-comparison, due to my desire to focus on technical skill past playing pretty things. I must strengthen my hands, and temper my fingers in-order to practice efficiently. Perhaps this will be reached by Grade III repertoire? Who knows?

Let the music journey, continue.

I try to, as much as I can… fit in allotments of music practice in-between my other responsibilities. The skill won’t acquiesce on its own. Save for the crucial element of retainment of knowledge.

Feedback:

For piano work–It is said that my technique has improved, through these five months of instruction. My tone has become more even, from finger to finger. Tenseness has been alleviated. I do not injure myself as much as I formerly did, with improper playing. Thank goodness.

I have made changes to the manner in-which I play, from my teacher’s instruction. To play from the kinetic energy of my elbows pivoting–the fingers, whichever one is pronated, acts in consequence to the transference of force. Finger strength is worked on primarily for the fingers to stay in a fixed and grounded position–not to draw effort from the fingers directly. Efficiency of energy transference is achieved from the fore-knuckle. Wrists must be supple, and loose to allow the hands to navigate from octave to octave on the keyboard–the groundedness and healthy tension applies only to the fixing on the fingers in the optimal position (the context of this, differs from piece to piece).

Between this, I have been filing back my nail-beds and now I can play on the flats of my fingers comfortable. I see this as a worthy trade.

Stiff playing, is attributed to sourcing weight from the fingers alone–when piano demands use of many muscles in-tandem. Stiff playing, is a big no-no.Speed, among other techniques still must be developed–this is, however in regards to the basal technique all pianists must learn to play decently.

Theory (Grade III, by AMEB standards):

This week, I had worked on:

Major & Minor scales up to four sharps and flats.
Intervals (number and quality).
Scale degrees and technical names.
Primary chords, and first inversions.

I had taken notes, in-relation to learning these. As such, my observations:

* The tonic and root are not synonymous to one another. The root refers to the base note in a chord.
* A dominant triad of a minor key must have an accidental for the leading note (scale degree 7).
* Tonic chord (I), Subdominant chord (IV), and dominant chords (V) are all (1st) primary chords. One will observe their use, mostly in mainstream pop music. These chords, being the primary ones are of PRIME importance.
* The circle of fifths allows one to memorize proceeding key signatures.
* The mnemonic Fresh-Cherries-Grow-Down-At-East-Brunswick is often used to memorize the placing of signature flats and sharps for each key.
* C Major’s Dominant (V) triad is also the Tonic (I) triad for G Major. This pattern is also applicable to proceeding key signatures–such as G Major’s Dominant triad, being D Major’s Tonic triad (D-F-A). The defining feature between each key, of course, is the signature. All is in the matter of context.
* Revision of scale degree names, as per the Ionian mode:
Tonic, supertonic, mediant, subdominant, dominant, submediant, leading tone (vii).
* The tonic can be numbered as either 1/8, for the pattern repeats itself when the tonic note is reached on the next range. The leading tone, is of a diminished nature–which explains the ‘circle’ above the lower-case Roman no. 7.
* Augmented notes, are the inverse the diminished notes–this will be explored further in grade IV music theory. There is also mention of double Augmented, and double diminished notes–again, however, this will be explored much further on.

Pianistic Practice:

Known Scales (GRADE II AMEB):
C Major.
A Natural Minor.
A Harmonic Minor.
G Major.
E Natural Minor.
E Harmonic Minor.
F Major.
D Natural Minor.
D Harmonic Minor.

Chromatic C scale.
Chromatic G scale.

2 8VE.

New Scales:
D Major.
B Natural Minor.
B Harmonic Minor.
Bb Major.
G Natural Minor.
G Harmonic Minor.
Chromatic D scale.

Singular LH & RH–and Contrary motions.

2 8VE.


Repertoire:
“Light Blue”.

A Rat Appreciation Post.

It is no secret. I am somewhat of a rat enthusiast. I own six of my own.

Meryl Keioskie.
My Rachmaninoff.

Rachmaninoff is my favorite, of course.

Meryl Keioskie
Meryl Keioskie.

Then there’s Papa Haydn. A huge mega-chonk.

Meryl Keioskie.

It’s a pity, that they only live for two to three years.

Such wonderful creatures. They bring me a lot of joy, they do.

Pianistic Practice 06-01-2021 to 20-01-2021.

By the Finnish painter Albert Gustaf Aristides Edelfelt . This is my wallpaper at the moment. Hyuk-hyuk~

Feedback:

Pianism will be delayed in progress partially, due to my PhD being due in early 2022 and my teaching drawing classes for the first portion of 2021. I am, at this stage… up to Grade I repertoire, and Grade III theory by AMEB conventions.

I will, however, always do music for the foreseeable future! It is now part of my life.

So far, I have been doing pianism since 29th of of October 2020. It has been four-five months, in my learning so far. Much has been learnt, and yet… I have barely scratched the surface.

My tone in playing scales is becoming more even. The wrists are observed to be nice and soft. However, the hand positioning needs more work. Being grounded is what I am working toward, with the fingers in-relation to being solid in their foundation. That is, the tips of the fingers are cemented into their position of the keys. No pivot occurs from the knuckle. That exerts unnecessary force. No tenseness, either. There is a fine-line to be drawn between being both tense, and applying the proper weight to the keyboard. Rather, the weight of the arm should be transfer the kinetic energy through the final joint (tip) of the fingers.

The hand moves, not the tips of the fingers. No force comes from the fingers, nor do they move. One knows they’re playing properly, if the playing feels comfortable and not over-strenuous. That is, from the tip of the fingers.

For pianists, especially at the professional grade… they are expected to play for long periods at time–and not just that! The repertoire they are expected to, at that level play, is very demanding. Physically.

Theory (GRADE III AMEB):

Worksheets:

The pulse is what the beat is divided into–the individual instance of the notes. An indicator of the rhythm. Grouping of notes, show clearly, how many beats are in each bar.

*Time Signature And Rhythm:

With groupings, one can beam the entire quavers/semi-quavers and so-on in the bar. However, it is not typically accepted, in composing standards. The time signature can always be deduced by the notational values of the notes within each bar—and, the groupings of the notes, if applicable.

Sometimes, on the rare occasion… pieces may not end of the tonic to signify. Instead, it can be from the tonic chord. For example, if a piece written in C Major ends in either C-E-G, it is still correct… however, if it doesn’t end on the C, it’ll sound comparatively more incomplete.

Compound: Pulses are counted.
Simple: Beats are counted.

+ More completion of the work-sheet, in-relation to Scale Degrees, and chords.

+ More practice of subdivision and rhythm. Via “Rhythm trainer”, and sourcing repertoire.

Pianistic Practice:

  • Grounded finger exercise: A flat and uniformed surface. Finger-tips stay stationary. The weight is pushed forward in a subtle manner. The tip stays grounded, and stays glued there. The finger-tips will feel well-worked, however not exerted. Do not move the tips. This will help build a foundational structure. One doesn’t play the piano, like a typist.

Form the bridge, and keep it steady. Never raise the shoulders, or wrists. One plays with a slight pushing forward movement, from the tips. It is very subtle. The structure of the hand, for a basis is being done right if no fingers collapse.

The primary knuckles are elevated higher than everything else, on the hand. Not on the wrists.

  • Intervals = Do so three minutes, three times per day.
  • Squeeze ball: Strengthen fingers/finger tips.

Extension of finger arc, outward so as to not hit my nails (my nail beds extend outward, to the tips of my fingers… thus I must adopt a flatter curve). The mechanic of applying weight to each key, from each finger is a subtle PUSH forward as opposed to HITTING/STRIKING the keys. Remember to utilize WEIGHT of the fingers. Drop them, don’t force them.

The publication of HANON, in regards to its finger exercises are criticized by contemporary school of piano as outdated. Many will find that the exercises within the publication, will lead to a more rigid style of playing… due to the player not employing the things aforementioned here. The force isn’t at all source from the hands.

Scales: (Grade Prelim to II scales)

Further refinement of playing. Grounded-finger playing. Between each note played, reset the position. Be quick to go slow. Verrrryyyy slow. “Push, and back.” One can see a tip of the wrist, back and forth–to utilize the force/weight produced from the upper-arm and so fourth.

Repertoire:

Repertoire isn’t of the utmost importance to me, at this stage in my pianistic progress. More or less, I am intending to spend a good year in solidifying technique. The emphasis with playing repertoire, is to slowly, but surely learn technique in each piece… so as to solidify technique.

Rhythm, and subdivision must also be practiced.

“Light Blue”

This piece, in-which I am learning has the first tuplet to play, in-which I am firstly introduced to. Just as well, between both hands, the rhythm is different. Learning the delicate process of playing staccato and legato per hand, is still something I am indeed working on.

Pianistic Practice 16-01-2021 to 30-01-2021.

Goals for 2021:

  • Begin studying musicianship (theory with an aural component).
  • Advance to 5th Grade Theory (AMEB).
  • Advance to 2nd Grade Repertoire (AMEB).
  • Memorizing all 24 keys (major and minors).

Objective for this week:
Practice staccatos: Brush the keys, with the tips of fingers–the flicking motion is utilized by the fore knuckle dragging toward you, the player.

Reduce tension for both hands. Equilibrate weight distributed between both. More flexibility.

Feedback:

Right hand: Skims the keys, as opposed to ‘sinking’ into them.
Left hand: Too ‘Rigid’, has lost discernible flexibility. Heavier then the right, due to it being over-strengthened.

Move your thumb over, as you play the next note–not straight away. It ruins the legato.

I must work on both hands, to ensure that the weight/heaviness of both are even and equilibrated. To resolve this, I am told to play very slowly and to sink into the bottom of the keys. Slowly, evenly to build up muscle-memory. Play slowly, and connect each note, slowly. All the while go playfully slow. The fore-knuckles of the finger, at the very tips is where the fingers curve.

I can now play past the black keys, as opposed to keeping at the edge–due to surpassing ‘beginners‘ status.

Technique is of utmost importance.


Misc. Notes:
Piano lunchtime concerts will be held again this April at The Conservatorium… and for that, I am excited. With these, I have also booked in advanced for Mahler, Eroica (Ero-ih-ca) of Beethoven, and a Jazz showcase. As well, there is also an oncoming competition for piano being spread across Australia, in a few cities–due to unforeseen circumstances, who knows if audiences could watch? I hope so. I miss watching pianists, live. ‘Deed I do.

There is also a Tchaikovsky concert coming up, sometime in April.

Music Theory:

+ Terms & definitions.
+ SATB (Soprano-Alto-Tenor-Bass): memorize.
+ Memorization of technical scale degree names.

Pianistic Practice:

Scales:


(1 8ve Single)
C Major
A Minor
A Harmonic Minor
G Major
E Minor
E Harmonic Minor
F Major
D Minor (The same fingering as C Major)
D Harmonic Minor (The same fingering as C Major)
C & G Major Chromatic scales.

(1/2 8ve Contrary Motion)
C Major
A Minor
A Harmonic Minor
G Major
E Minor
E Harmonic Minor


(1/2 8ve Similar Motion)
C Major
A Minor
A Harmonic Minor
G Major
E Minor
E Harmonic Minor

+Staccato scales.
+Gently Separate 4th and 5th fingers
(Ensure that you’re not playing two notes, at once).
+Move/shift weight whilst playing, for energy efficiency.

Repertoire:

  • Skatchka”
  • “Light Blue”: Hand position changes, and rhythm changes with triplets.
  • Czerny opus 599 & 299 (what many students practice from, at The Conservatorium).

Pianistic Practice ’til 16-01-2021.

Alright, onto music!

In review for the new year, here are some objectives of what I plan to achieve this year with pianism and music in general. That is, between other obligations of mine… ’til the closing of this year:

  1. Memorize, and learn all 24 keys before the end of the year.
  2. Advance to second grade repertoire on piano.
  3. Advance to fifth grade theory.

In-between this, I’ve the intention of expanding more of my skillset in musicality, finger control, finger strength and so-fourth. I first began studying music some six months ago. Pianism was then studied three months after that. The journey has been a tremendous one, that I will indeed continue for many years to come. Progress may be delayed slightly, due to my PhD being due in early 2022. However, again, it doesn’t matter. The progress is of the utmost importance.

Pianistic Practice:

*Scales:

From my experience, when I first started taking lessons under my piano teacher… I was instructed to always practice scales–even she, at her level still practices with scales. I’ve found, in my practicing scales… they are perhaps the most beneficial way to acquire technical skill on the piano, past a sole reliance on repertoire. Many of the fundamental, and underlying skills (there are a lot of meta-skills–think, skills within skills, that a pianist must learn) can be acquired through scales.

Repertoire however, is still important for learning more micro-skills… just as well as articulation, rhythm, hand positions, different fingering, and so-fourth.

Scales have assisted in my becoming familiar with all 88 keys of the piano. Just as well: the amount of weight I ought to apply to register a better quality of sound (no thumping all the time); Finger independence, with finger switching; The position of hands on the keyboard, as well as the elevation of wrists above the keys–and my observation that the forearm, and wrists ought to be utilized past the fingers themselves. The fingers move to a minute degree, however, ‘power’ should not be sourced by the fingers alone.

As a pianist, economizing the use of energy throughout your playing is paramount. Especially since, there is more demanding repertoire to be learnt–and some pieces can extend over thirty minutes. With extensive octave leaps, and articulations… Rachmaninoff, I’ve heard is some of the most difficult repertoire to play. His, and of course… 20th century pieces.

LH & RH separate:
C Major (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
A Minor (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
A Harmonic Minor (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
G Major (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
E Minor (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
E Harmonic Minor (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
F Major (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
Chromatic G Major & C Major (1 8ve)

Contrary motion both LH & RH:
C Major (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
A Minor (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
A Harmonic Minor (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
G Major (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
E Minor (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
E Harmonic Minor (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
F Major (1 8ve & 2 8ve)

Relative motion both LH & RH:
C Major (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
A Minor (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
A Harmonic Minor (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
G Major (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
E Minor (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
E Harmonic Minor (1 8ve & 2 8ve)
F Major (1 8ve & 2 8ve)

*Repertoire:

Skachka – Bi 15 from Dvadtstat Chetire Legkiye p’esi Op. 39.
Note:
Micro-slurs.
Dynamics. Piano. Forte.
Articulated notes.
Hands higher up on the keyboard.


Light blue from Piano Grooves I:
Note:
F Major.
Dynamics.
Deviations from key.


A little hush-song No. 5 from First Year Pieces:
Note:
Compound time signature.
Dynamics.
New Rhythm Pattern.

Some more practice composing:

Three flats in the key signature, BB~

The tonic is ‘Eb’, with the piece finishing on Eb–I made it more uniform by starting with Eb, also. Just a test really, with rhythm, articulations, and the sostenuto pedal. A piece truly doesn’t feel complete, unless one finishes a piece with the tonic… it appears to be an implicit rule within many compositions. The bass–or the left hand of the pianist with the triads reveals the time signature, also.

I had this left-over from 2020. It’s an edit of ‘Tender Confession’ From my Gaspard suite. Edited through Adobe audition to make it sound more ambient. Enjoy~